[Home]Installing LinuxCNC

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 THIS PAGE HAS BEEN PARTIALLY EDITED TO REFLECT THE AGREEMENT TO REBRAND EMC2 AS LINUXCNC AND THE RELEASE OF LINUXCNC 2.5. 
If you are still interested in earlier versions, you may find the superseded Installing EMC2 page of interest.


Contents

1. Installing Precompiled LinuxCNC for Ubuntu
1.1. Installing Ubuntu and LinuxCNC from the LinuxCNC Live-CD
1.2. Installing to an existing Ubuntu 10.04 system using precompiled LinuxCNC packages
1.3. Installing to an existing Ubuntu 8.04 system using precompiled LinuxCNC packages
1.4. Installing to an existing Ubuntu system using precompiled LinuxCNC Simulator packages
1.5. After installing to an existing Ubuntu system
1.6. Installing to existing Ubuntu systems using debs of bleeding-edge and other recent git versions
2. Installing to Ubuntu 10.04 or 8.04 from source
2.1. Preparing Ubuntu to compile LinuxCNC
2.1.1. On "Stock" Ubuntu
2.1.2. On Ubuntu with LinuxCNC package already installed
2.2. Getting the source with git
2.3. Getting the latest updates with git
2.4. Resolving outstanding build dependencies
2.5. Building LinuxCNC (realtime)
2.6. Building LinuxCNC (simulator)
2.7. Building the documents along with LinuxCNC
2.8. Accomplishing the above steps on an offline machine
2.9. Running LinuxCNC
2.10. Reconfiguring LinuxCNC
2.11. Building EMC and a custom kernel
2.12. Pre-requisites for Ubuntu 9.10
2.13. Building EMC with Ubuntu 9.10 SMP for an Atom Dual Core CPU
2.14. Installing supplementary packages for gladevcp
2.15. Making sure all package requirements have been resolved
3. On Debian
3.1. Debian Lenny compile RTAI
3.2. Debian Lenny compile EMC2
3.3. Debian Etch compile RTAI
3.4. Debian Etch compile EMC2
3.5. Debian Etch Server and Diskless EMC2 Thin Clients
4. On Gentoo
5. Other ways of getting the source code
6. Preparing other versions of Linux to compile emc2
6.1. RTAI from scratch
6.2. Realtime on 64-bit systems
7. Nvidia Card configuration issues
8. Uninstalling EMC2 from source
9. Selectively importing a branch from another Git repository

1. Installing Precompiled LinuxCNC for Ubuntu

1.1. Installing Ubuntu and LinuxCNC from the LinuxCNC Live-CD

If you do not already have a Linux system, then you can install Ubuntu Linux and LinuxCNC at the same time. Just follow the beginning instructions down through "trying it out..." on [Basic Installation] which is a page on the companion website. If you use this method, you don't need to read the rest of this page; just start Using LinuxCNC. You can also use the Live-CD to Install to CompactFlash.

1.2. Installing to an existing Ubuntu 10.04 system using precompiled LinuxCNC packages

If you have already installed Ubuntu 10.04 "Lucid Lynx", you can install LinuxCNC without reinstalling your whole system. Simply download and run the installation script: http://linuxcnc.org/install-scripts/lucid/linuxcnc-install.sh

You can follow the instructions beginning with Step 3 on [Basic Installation] which is a page on the companion website. (Note that Firefox downloads the script to your ~/Downloads directory, not to the Desktop.) If you use this method, you don't need to read the rest of this page; just start Using LinuxCNC.

1.3. Installing to an existing Ubuntu 8.04 system using precompiled LinuxCNC packages

If you have already installed Ubuntu 8.04 "Hardy Heron", you can install LinuxCNC without reinstalling your whole system. Simply download and run the installation script http://linuxcnc.org/install-scripts/hardy/linuxcnc-install.sh

You can follow the instructions beginning with Step 3 on [Basic Installation] which is a page on the companion website. (Note that Firefox downloads the script to your ~/Downloads directory, not to the Desktop.) If you use this method, you don't need to read the rest of this page; just start Using LinuxCNC.

1.4. Installing to an existing Ubuntu system using precompiled LinuxCNC Simulator packages

A LinuxCNC Simulator is convenient for exploring LinuxCNC, playing with G-Code onscreen, and developing and testing non-realtime user-space components, all on a Ubuntu system that does not have the RTAI kernel extensions installed. Go to LinuxCNC Pure Simulator for instructions on installing precompiled LinuxCNC simulator packages to existing Ubuntu systems.

1.5. After installing to an existing Ubuntu system

If all you want to do is run LinuxCNC, you can stop reading this page now! The instructions above give you a standard, released version of LinuxCNC, which is what most users have. It is the version with the best support from manuals, the mailing list, and the IRC channel.

If you want to compile additional components for LinuxCNC, you can stop reading this page now! You do not have to recompile LinuxCNC just to add components. For instructions on adding components, read [How to compile and install a component].

Even with your additional components, the instructions above give you a standard, released version of LinuxCNC, which is what most users have. It is the version with the best support from manuals, the mailing list, and the IRC channel.

1.6. Installing to existing Ubuntu systems using debs of bleeding-edge and other recent git versions

Precompiled packages of the most recent software in our [LinuxCNC git] repo are automatically built, and are available to be installed. Many users will find installing these more convenient than building from source. The set of available packages and instructions on how to use them are available on the [LinuxCNC buildbot].

2. Installing to Ubuntu 10.04 or 8.04 from source

These instructions make extensive use of the Linux command-line interface in which commands are typed into a Terminal. If you are not familiar with this mode of operation, you should take time to learn it.

2.1. Preparing Ubuntu to compile LinuxCNC

The following sections use the program "apt-get" to install software and "git" to download source code to your computer. Once you have installed a software package or used git clone, you do not need to repeat that step to build a new version of LinuxCNC. You will be notified of available updates for any installed software. See the section "Getting the latest updates with git" to see how to get the latest LinuxCNC source code.

2.1.1. On "Stock" Ubuntu

You can skip to the next numbered section if you have already installed LinuxCNC and the realtime kernel, or if you installed from a Live-CD downloaded from the linuxcnc.org website.

If you wish to build LinuxCNC from source, follow the steps given below. Indented text that looks

 like the text on this line
is text that you type into the terminal or editor window.

First enable the universe repository (to find needed packages not in the Canonical repository ) if it isn't already. This can be done in the Ubuntu GUI by clicking System>Administration>Software Sources from the menu bar and ticking "Community-maintained Open Source software (universe)" in the Ubuntu Software tab if it isn't already. The same tab can be reached by clicking Settings>Repositories in the menu bar of the Synaptic Package Manager (which can be started from the command line by typing "sudo synaptic".)

You need to add the LinuxCNC repository to the apt sources list if it hasn't been already. This also can be done in the Ubuntu GUI by clicking System>Administration>Software Sources from the menu bar or clicking Settings>Repositories in the menu bar of the Synaptic Package Manager. In the list presented in the Other Software tab, look for the following entries to be present and ticked

-for Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx)

 http://www.linuxcnc.org/ lucid base linuxcnc2.5
 http://www.linuxcnc.org/ lucid base linuxcnc2.5 (Source Code)

-for Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)

 http://www.linuxcnc.org/ hardy base linuxcnc2.5
 http://www.linuxcnc.org/ hardy base linuxcnc2.5 (Source Code)

If these entries are not present, then use the +Add... function to add the following two lines one at a time

-for Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx)

 deb http://www.linuxcnc.org/ lucid base linuxcnc2.5
 deb-src http://www.linuxcnc.org/ lucid base linuxcnc2.5

-for Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)

 deb http://www.linuxcnc.org/ hardy base linuxcnc2.5
 deb-src http://www.linuxcnc.org/ hardy base linuxcnc2.5

<<TBA - how to add, using the Ubuntu GUI, the public key that corresponds to the GPG key used to digitally sign the LinuxCNC source packages.>>

As an alternative to working in the Ubuntu GUI, do this (the following will also install the precompiled LinuxCNC):

-for Ubuntu 10.04 (Lucid Lynx)

 wget http://www.linuxcnc.org/install-scripts/lucid/linuxcnc-install.sh
 chmod 755 linuxcnc-install.sh
 ./linuxcnc-install.sh

-for Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)

 wget http://www.linuxcnc.org/install-scripts/hardy/linuxcnc-install.sh
 chmod 755 linuxcnc-install.sh
 ./linuxcnc-install.sh

Ubuntu will ask you for your root password in order for the linuxcnc-install.sh script to modify the apt sources list, to add the public key, and to install the new required packages. At this point, you must reboot and select the rtai kernel from the grub bootloader menu. Then, continue with the next step.

2.1.2. On Ubuntu with LinuxCNC package already installed

Use apt-get to install additional packages required to rebuild LinuxCNC from source:
 sudo apt-get install libpth-dev
 sudo apt-get build-dep linuxcnc

This operation will download and install more than 500Mb of archives to a stock Ubuntu system---15 minutes in this writer's case---time enough to make a pot of coffee, catch up on email, or whatever; don't just sit and watch the screen-crawl.

Note: It would seem to this writer that the build-dep operation should catch the need for the libpth-dev library but at the moment (20120819) it seems to not do so.

If you get an error like this one:

 Package libpth-dev is not available, but is referred to by another package.
 This may mean that the package is missing, has been obsoleted, or is only available from another source
 E: Package libpth-dev has no installation candidate

then you have not configured the apt sources list correctly and the compilation step will fail.

2.2. Getting the source with git

LinuxCNC source is stored in a system called Git. If you plan to make changes to LinuxCNC, it's highly recommended to use this method. With git, you can maintain your changes over time while getting bugfixes and new features. Git also makes it easy to submit your improvements to the linuxcnc.org team for inclusion in future versions of the software.

First, follow the steps above to get the extra packages needed to compile LinuxCNC.

If it is not already present, you also will need to install the git program:

 sudo apt-get install git-core gitk git-gui

Once you have installed git, you will use it to create a local copy (a "clone") of the LinuxCNC source-files project from our git server

 git clone git://git.linuxcnc.org/git/linuxcnc.git linuxcnc-dev
This puts the project in the directory 'linuxcnc-dev'. To put the local copy of the project in a different location, just change the last argument of the 'git clone' command. (Note: many discussants assume this directory is still named 'emc2-dev'. It doesn't matter what the name is, just be consistent in your work.) Git will download about 55MB of data and it takes a few minutes (5 minutes in this writer's case) to complete. You should only have to do this once.

The commands below generally assume you have now changed to the directory created by the git clone command.

By default, you will get files from "master", which is the name for the branch where new feature development takes place. At the current time (20120820) this is LinuxCNC 2.6.0~pre. If you want to track another branch, say the current, stable, v2.5 branch,

 cd linuxcnc-dev
 git branch --track v2.5_branch origin/v2.5_branch
 git checkout v2.5_branch
(For branches before v2.5_branch, substitute an underscore for a full stop, e.g., v2_4_branch)

To return to the master branch

 git checkout master

To get a particular version of LinuxCNC, use

 git checkout vX.Y.Z
For instance, to get released version 2.5.0, use
 git checkout v2.5.0

Note that if you use a tag for a specific release, you will never get any updates since the tag specifies a particular snapshot of the files. Using a branch tag, such as "v2.4_branch", will continue to get changes as long as that branch is being developed.

Git has more instructions, such as how to update your version of emc2 after other developers have made improvements.

2.3. Getting the latest updates with git

Assuming that you already have a checkout from git, you can get the latest updates using
 git pull
If you have made changes locally, then before doing this step you must "git commit" or "git stash" them. For more information, see Git.

2.4. Resolving outstanding build dependencies

If you do not have a recent LinuxCNC install from CD or net on your machine, or if the installation requirements have gotten ahead of this wiki page, you might be missing some build dependencies (packages needed for a compile, or documentation build). These make the next step (build) fail during the './configure ..' run.

If this happens, or even just to forestall it happening, proceed as follows in the directory created by the git clone command:

 cd debian
 ./configure -a (if installing simulator use "./configure sim" instead)  
 cd ..
 dpkg-checkbuilddeps

Then "apt-get install" each of the missing build dependencies, and your configure should work (the configure script in the ./src directory this time, not in the ./debian directory). If installing simulator - don't apt-get install the rtai-modules-x.x.... package.

If you're building the current master (2.6pre) you need an additional dependency

 sudo apt-get install libboost-python-dev

I have gotten this error a couple times
"configure: error: Tcl and Tk versions must be the same,...."
try adding:
--with-tkConfig=/usr/lib/tk8.5/tkConfig.sh --with-tclConfig=/usr/lib/tcl8.5/tclConfig.sh
to the ./configure command

2.5. Building LinuxCNC (realtime)

If you have already installed LinuxCNC from the Live-CD do not use --prefix/make install. Use the 'run in place' method (the default) instead.

Run these commands in the directory created by git above (e.g., linuxcnc-dev):

 cd src
 ./autogen.sh       
 ./configure --enable-run-in-place
 make 
 make install-menus
 sudo make setuid

the make command may take several minutes to complete.

2.6. Building LinuxCNC (simulator)

If you have already built a realtime version of LinuxCNC then you should first read the "Reconfiguring LinuxCNC" section below.

Run these commands in the directory created by git above:

 cd src
 ./autogen.sh      
 ./configure --enable-simulator
 make
 make install-menus

the make command may take several minutes to complete.

2.7. Building the documents along with LinuxCNC

Add "--enable-build-documentation" to the ./configure line, then "make". To build only HTML documentation, specify "--enable-build-documentation=html". To build only PDF documentation, specify "--enable-build-documentation=pdf".

2.8. Accomplishing the above steps on an offline machine

All the above assumes the subject computer is connected to the Internet. Here are one user's notes dealing with a machine that is offline. While now somewhat out-of-date and not complete with respect to transferring the LinuxCNC source files, they contain the essential ingredient, using the Synaptic Package Manager's ability to create a package download list.

Offline machines can get autogen & build-essential packages using Synaptic and a thumb drive.

begin ------------------offline machine gets autogen and build-essential pks -------------------
 The offline machine wont have autogen nor build-essentials to begin with, so what to do?
 Use a thumb drive (or similar) and Syanaptic to create 'wget' scripts.
 Just grabbing files from internet does not work well, 
you need to accommodate the dependencies for the files you grab. 
Synaptic can review your system state and build a list of files based on what that state is. 
The state of your package information can go stale, and you cannot update that information while offline, 
but the following sequence helped me get the files needed to build emc for an offline system.

 I used a thumb drive and took advantage of a feature in Synaptic 'File|Generate package download list'. 
This command creates a shell script file that uses wget for the <b> already selected files</b>.
( the 'already selected files' might be autogen and build-essential for example ).
Once this script is generated, it can be placed onto the removable media, taken to a machine that <b>is</b> online, 
and the packages retrieved to the removable media.

 Then, the media can be moved back to the offline system, and when running Synaptic again, 
choose 'Files | Add downloaded packages'. 
For most folks the default action of installing all files will be whats wanted. 
(this may not be what you want to do, and you can cancel if thats true, the files will be placed in the system pkg cache for later use ).

During the on-line downloads, the wget program may error with a message saying a file is not found. 
In my case it happened because a file version was no longer available due to a stale package information database. 
 For example, 
simply changing python-gnome2-extras_2.19.1-0ubuntu7.1_i386.deb 
to              python-gnome2-extras_2.19.1-0ubuntu7.2_i386.deb in the script fixed this for me. 
 So a few stabs at the wget script should get all the files you need for the offline machine. 
hth tom3p
end ------------------offline machine gets autogen and build-essential pks -------------------

2.9. Running LinuxCNC

In the top directory that you placed the source, run
 . ./scripts/rip-environment
 linuxcnc
and choose a configuration file from the list offered in the Configuration Selector, or specify one on the command line:
 linuxcnc <path to configuration ini file>
for example
 linuxcnc ~/linuxcnc/configs/sim/axis/axis.ini
If you get an error like
 Realtime system did not load
then stop the rtai with
 halcmd unloadrt all
 halcmd stop
then start again. Sometimes the first load will clear up an issue...

2.10. Reconfiguring LinuxCNC

If you compile for realtime in a directory tree (git checkout), and then later reconfigure for --enable-simulator, you must do

 make clean
to get rid of the realtime object files. The same applies when switching from simulation to realtime. This is because "make" doesn't know that you've changed modes. It only sees that the object files are newer than the source, and thinks they don't need to be recompiled.

Another potential problem when switching from realtime to simulation is environment variables. The command

 . scripts/rip-environment
sets some environment variables in your shell to point to various parts of the run-in-place code. Some of those variables are different for realtime vs. simulation. If you switch modes, you should close the shell you were using, open a new one, and run
 . scripts/rip-environment
before starting LinuxCNC from that shell.

The same issues can arise if you have multiple git checkouts and switch between them using the same shell. If you are switching between versions or checkouts, it is best to use one shell for each one.


Material below has not been updated to reflect the changes due to the LinuxCNC rebranding process and the release of V2.5

2.11. Building EMC and a custom kernel

Instructions for building a custom kernel and rtai configuration and then compiling EMC for that kernel is on its own page: EMC With Custom Kernel

2.12. Pre-requisites for Ubuntu 9.10

Just some extra packages to install prior to compiling from scratch.

 $ sudo apt-get install libpth-dev tcl8.5-dev tk8.5-dev bwidget libxaw7-dev libreadline5-dev python-dev libglu1-mesa-dev libxinerama-dev autoconf python-tk libglib2.0-dev libxft-dev gettext

2.13. Building EMC with Ubuntu 9.10 SMP for an Atom Dual Core CPU

Step by step instructions, from bare metal to working system; compiling a custom Ubuntu 9.10 kernel with SMP, with rtai and EMC2: EMC Ubuntu91

2.14. Installing supplementary packages for gladevcp

These are needed for running gladevcp applications when not installing from a precompiled package:

 $ sudo apt-get install python-gnome2 python-glade2 python-numpy python-imaging  python-xlib python-gtkglext1 python-configobj python-gtksourceview2 

2.15. Making sure all package requirements have been resolved

You can check the build dependencies of the source tree against your running debian system.

If configured to build for the running kernel:

 $ debian/configure -r 
 $ dpkg-checkbuilddeps

If configured to build without a realtime kernel (simulator mode):

 $ debian/configure sim
 $ dpkg-checkbuilddeps

The dpkg-checkbuilddeps command should produce no output.

Run debian/configure without any options for usage help.

3. On Debian

3.1. Debian Lenny compile RTAI

Instructions for compiling RTAI in Debian Lenny are on their own page: Debian Lenny Compile RTAI

3.2. Debian Lenny compile EMC2

Instructions for compiling EMC2 in Debian Lenny are on their own page: Debian Lenny Compile LinuxCNC

3.3. Debian Etch compile RTAI

Instructions for compiling RTAI in Debian Etch are on their own page: Debian Etch Compile RTAI

3.4. Debian Etch compile EMC2

Instructions for compiling EMC2 in Debian Etch are on their own page: Debian Etch Compile LinuxCNC

3.5. Debian Etch Server and Diskless EMC2 Thin Clients

Instructions to prepare a system with a Debian Etch Server and many diskless EMC2 thin clients are on their own page: Debian Etch Server And Diskless LinuxCNC Thin Clients

4. On Gentoo

Instructions to install EMC2 and RTAI using portage are on their own page: EmcOnGentoo

5. Other ways of getting the source code

Released Versions (tarballs)

Released versions of emc2.3 and newer are [available from http://linuxcnc.org/hardy/dists/hardy/emc2.3/source/ the package server].

Released versions of emc2.2.x and older are available from the [SourceForge download area].

The current kernel source package can be installed like so:

  apt-get source linux-image-2.6.32-122-rtai

Released versions (apt-get)

If you are using Ubuntu, you can get the source with 'apt-get source emc2'. More on building the debian packages from source is at BuildingUbuntuPackages.

Development Versions (git)

Use Git to follow development of emc2.

6. Preparing other versions of Linux to compile emc2

NOTE: the material in this section is getting stale and should taken as being merely indicative. For example, it references older versions of the kernel and rtai patches than are used in recent releases of LinuxCNC.

6.1. RTAI from scratch

Follow the instructions at RtaiSteps to build a real-time kernel for your particular Linux distribution. After that, you'll have to figure out the names of the extra packages needed to install and run emc2. As an aid, these are the packages required by the emc2 ubuntu package:

Depends: libatk1.0-0 (>= 1.9.0), libc6 (>= 2.3.4-1), libcairo2 (>= 1.0.2-2), libfontconfig1 (>= 2.3.0), libgcc1 (>= 1:4.0.2), libgl1-mesa | libgl1, libglib2.0-0 (>= 2.10.0), libglu1-mesa | libglu1, libgtk2.0-0 (>= 2.8.0), libice6, libpango1.0-0 (>= 1.12.3), libreadline5 (>= 5.1), libsm6, libstdc++6 (>= 4.0.2-4), libx11-6, libxaw7, libxcursor1 (>> 1.1.2), libxext6, libxfixes3, libxi6, libxinerama1, libxmu6, libxrandr2, libxrender1, libxt6, tcl8.4 (>= 8.4.5), tk8.4 (>= 8.4.5), linux-image-2.6.15-magma, rtai-modules-2.6.15-magma, tcl8.4, tk8.4, libreadline5, python2.4-numarray, python2.4-imaging, python2.4-imaging-tk, python (>= 2.4), python (<< 2.5), emc2, python (<< 2.5), python (>= 2.4), bwidget (>= 1.7), bwidget (<< 1.8), python2.4-tk, python2.4-xml
Build-Depends: debhelper (>> 4.0.0), linux-image-2.6.15-magma, rtai-modules-2.6.15-magma, linux-headers-2.6.15-magma, gcc-4.0, g++, make, libc6-dev, tcl8.4-dev, tk8.4-dev, libgtk2.0-dev, pciutils-dev, libncurses-dev, gettext, libxaw7-dev, libreadline5-dev, lyx-qt, python, tetex-bin, latex2html, python2.4-dev, libglu1-mesa-dev, libgl1-mesa-dev, libgnomeprint2.2-dev, groff, bwidget, tetex-extra

6.2. Realtime on 64-bit systems

Since emc2.3, emc2 now works on at least some x86-64 CPUs in 64-bit mode. These instructions were followed on an Ubuntu "Dapper" system. AMD X2 3800+ CPU, 2GB RAM, nvidia nforce-mcp51 chipset, X server using "vesa" driver.

7. Nvidia Card configuration issues

The closed source nvidia drivers are known to be incompatible with realtime kernels. This has been reported to nvidia but they seem uninterested in fixing it, and because their drivers are not open source, nobody else can fix it either.

To get your nvidia graphics card working, edit the xorg.conf file in the /etc/X11 directory. At about line 66, in the section "Device", find a line that looks like: Driver "nvidia" , replace nvidia with "nv" or "vesa" (try "nv" first). If you have previously tried to use the nvidia driver, you must remove nvidia-related packages by issuing the following command from a terminal:

 sudo apt-get --purge remove nvidia-glx nvidia-settings nvidia-kernel-common 

There is at least one report that even when using the open source 'nv' driver, the latency test will show failures.

8. Uninstalling EMC2 from source

If you wish to remove a package, a simple `sudo apt-get remove emc2` will suffice. However, if you've installed emc2 from source with `make install` then there will be files left around everywhere. You can not then install emc2 from a package, as the files will conflict. This is an attempt to document all of them. The following script assumes that you still have the compiled emc2 source tree. This is why we recommend to always use --enable-run-in-place when you build your own emc2.

export SRCPATH=<path to your emc build>

 #remove the python modules
 cd /usr/lib/python2.4/site-packages/
 ls $SRCPATH/lib/python | xargs sudo rm -r

 sudo rm -r /usr/local/etc/emc2/ /usr/realtime*/modules/emc2/ /usr/local/share/emc/ /usr/local/share/axis/
 sudo rm /etc/init.d/realtime

 cd /usr/local/bin/
 ls $SRCPATH/bin/ | xargs sudo rm
 sudo rm emc emcmkdesktop halrun 

 cd /usr/local/lib
 ls $SRCPATH/lib/ | xargs sudo rm

You may need to apt-get remove --purge emc2 if you installed it "over" the existing install, otherwise you will get the wrong /etc/init.d/realtime script (or no script!)

One way to avoid this predicament is instead of "make install", to use the "checkinstall" program, which monitors the install process and creates a package for you that can easily be uninstalled.

9. Selectively importing a branch from another Git repository

Sometimes, development branches or fixes are announced on the mailing list or IRC by pointing to a branch in another git repository, for instance "can you try http://git.mah.priv.at/gitweb/emc2-dev.git/shortlog/refs/heads/g84-dev ?"

To try out such a branch, you need to add the remote repository and setup to track that branch. It's useful to avoid importing other branches which might happen to exist in this repository to save disk space and time, and avoid cluttering your repository with remote branches you're not interested in. To do so, proceed as follows:

 $ git remote add mah git://git.mah.priv.at/emc2-dev.git
 $ git config remote.mah.fetch +refs/heads/g84-dev:refs/remotes/mah/g84-dev
 $ git fetch mah
 $ git branch --track g84-dev mah/g84-dev
 $ git checkout g84-dev

Sometimes, more commits are added to such a remote branch. To update your local branch, use this:

 $ git checkout g84-dev
 $ git pull

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