[Home]History of Best Wiring Practices

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Revision 3 . . October 26, 2017 12:59 pm by KimK [Add nowiki tags to LinuxCNC mentions.]
Revision 2 . . (edit) April 18, 2017 8:43 pm by Joe Hildreth
Revision 1 . . April 18, 2017 8:35 pm by Joe Hildreth
  

Difference (from prior major revision) (no other diffs)

Changed: 9c9
Then I decided, I would make a series of tutorials on how to locate an input pin, write the G-Code and everything else related to setting up a touch off plate for the new guys and gals out there trying to figure all this stuff out. It was during this exercise that I learned my neat and pretty wiring job was not conducive to a properly operating CNC Machine. I discovered this when I was trying to run a G38.2 linear probe command and it would stop and some random position along the way. I would restart it and it would stop again. I had to run the commands several times before the probe command would finally complete. I knew that something wasn't right, so I made a video and posted the question to the LinuxCNC forums. Within a few hours, a couple of folks on the forum had given me enough information to understand what was going on. A HUGE thank you goes to ArcEye? and Andy Pugh for all the advice and suggestions they gave me. The culprit it seemed was noise.
Then I decided, I would make a series of tutorials on how to locate an input pin, write the G-Code and everything else related to setting up a touch off plate for the new guys and gals out there trying to figure all this stuff out. It was during this exercise that I learned my neat and pretty wiring job was not conducive to a properly operating CNC Machine. I discovered this when I was trying to run a G38.2 linear probe command and it would stop and some random position along the way. I would restart it and it would stop again. I had to run the commands several times before the probe command would finally complete. I knew that something wasn't right, so I made a video and posted the question to the LinuxCNC forums. Within a few hours, a couple of folks on the forum had given me enough information to understand what was going on. A HUGE thank you goes to ArcEye? and Andy Pugh for all the advice and suggestions they gave me. The culprit it seemed was noise.

Changed: 21c21
The AC that you use can inject noise into your power supplies and other equipment. If you have motors running on the same circuit for example, can create noise on the line if it is running on the same circuit as your CNC components. RF signals can also be superimposed onto AC line voltage. Years ago, this fact was exploited in some home entertainment systems to provide music to a remote speaker over the AC line. In-line filters are made to attenuate (reduce or block) this type of noise from the AC line voltage before it is run into your equipment. AC Line Filters can be found at electronic supply houses. LinuxCNC forum user “lead_injection” recommends Medical Grade filters as they have the lowest leakage current.
The AC that you use can inject noise into your power supplies and other equipment. If you have motors running on the same circuit for example, can create noise on the line if it is running on the same circuit as your CNC components. RF signals can also be superimposed onto AC line voltage. Years ago, this fact was exploited in some home entertainment systems to provide music to a remote speaker over the AC line. In-line filters are made to attenuate (reduce or block) this type of noise from the AC line voltage before it is run into your equipment. AC Line Filters can be found at electronic supply houses. LinuxCNC forum user “lead_injection” recommends Medical Grade filters as they have the lowest leakage current.

Changed: 152c152
:The hardware abstraction layer (HAL) of LinuxCNC has a Debounce component. The Debounce component has a single input pin and a single output pin. Its job is to look at the input and to send the output after a programmed delay time. The Debounce HAL component will be covered in a separate tutorial when we create a touchoff plate for the CNC machine. More information can be found for the Debounce component by visiting the following URLs:
:The hardware abstraction layer (HAL) of LinuxCNC has a Debounce component. The Debounce component has a single input pin and a single output pin. Its job is to look at the input and to send the output after a programmed delay time. The Debounce HAL component will be covered in a separate tutorial when we create a touchoff plate for the CNC machine. More information can be found for the Debounce component by visiting the following URLs:

Changed: 176c176
:1. LinuxCNC and Machine Related Questions
:1. LinuxCNC and Machine Related Questions

Changed: 178c178
:Additional Information and help can be found by using the LinuxCNC forums. If you are not a member of these forums, I encourage you to join. Please visit:
:Additional Information and help can be found by using the LinuxCNC forums. If you are not a member of these forums, I encourage you to join. Please visit:

Changed: 198c198
I would like to thank the following people from the LinuxCNC forums for their input on this tutorial. It is with their help I am able to give you the information contained herein.
I would like to thank the following people from the LinuxCNC forums for their input on this tutorial. It is with their help I am able to give you the information contained herein.

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